Clark Loafers in Kenya

Clark Loafers in Kenya
Clark Loafers in Kenya
Clark Loafers in Kenya have decided to donate to one of the biggest charities in Africa but are left no choice but to fight.

This week a campaign started from Ghana to raise money for the school in Nyagat, where it will be held next week.
https://jiji.co.ke/55-loafers/clark

“The schools are our pride and joy,” he said. The donations come from more than 50 organisations, including churches, charities, NGOs and civil society groups.

“We are all proud to have taken on the challenge of raising awareness about the need for school children to come out,” he said.

“When it comes to tackling economic inequalities they always ask me: how was this possible when you’re a poor country?”

The school has been providing education for almost 500 children across Nyagat since it opened nine years ago.

The charity’s chief executive, Jonathan A. O’Connor, says many parents have never considered accepting a child who was not born into that family.

“It does not make sense to allow a child like this to get a school education,” he explained.

Mr O’Connor says the school has more than 2,500 children in four countries and expects to increase its capacity by 200 when the end of the year is due.

Topics: religion-and-beliefs, education, local-government, japan

First posted

Clark Loafers in Kenya

Clark Loafers in Kenya
Clark Loafers in Kenya
Clark Loafers in Kenya have decided to donate to one of the biggest charities in Africa but are left no choice but to fight.

This week a campaign started from Ghana to raise money for the school in Nyagat, where it will be held next week.
https://jiji.co.ke/55-loafers/clark

“The schools are our pride and joy,” he said. The donations come from more than 50 organisations, including churches, charities, NGOs and civil society groups.

“We are all proud to have taken on the challenge of raising awareness about the need for school children to come out,” he said.

“When it comes to tackling economic inequalities they always ask me: how was this possible when you’re a poor country?”

The school has been providing education for almost 500 children across Nyagat since it opened nine years ago.

The charity’s chief executive, Jonathan A. O’Connor, says many parents have never considered accepting a child who was not born into that family.

“It does not make sense to allow a child like this to get a school education,” he explained.

Mr O’Connor says the school has more than 2,500 children in four countries and expects to increase its capacity by 200 when the end of the year is due.

Topics: religion-and-beliefs, education, local-government, japan

First posted